The Way To Spot Severs Disease?

posted on 15 May 2015 06:03 by gutierrezlukzqrnegj
Overview

One of the most common complaints of youth athletes is heel pain. This generally occurs during the early portion of the growth phase around 8-10 years old, and can recur towards the end of growth, (14-16 years old). Symptoms are typically in the back portion of the heel, can occur unilaterally or bilaterally, usually having a gradual onset. The heel bone?s growth plate is in this area, which is immature soft bone and cartilage. A ?tug of war? occurs in this region from the foot growing longer and the leg bones getting taller, which puts tension on this heel bone area known as the calcaneal apophysis. The inflammation is called calcaneal apophysitis or ?Sever?s disease?.

Causes

Your child may have pain along the edges of one or both heels during exercise. The pain usually goes away with rest, but may be worse in the morning. Your child's heel may also be slightly swollen and warm. The heel pain may be worse when your child climbs steps or stands on tiptoe. It may cause your child to limp.

Symptoms

A few signs and symptoms point to Sever?s disease, which may affect one or both heels. These include pain at the heel or around the Achilles tendon, Heel pain during physical exercise, especially activities that require running or jumping, worsening of pain after exercise, a tender swelling or bulge on the heel that is sore to touch, calf muscle stiffness first thing in the morning, limping, a tendency to tiptoe.

Diagnosis

X-rays are normal in Sever's disease, but your doctor will probably get X-rays to rule out other problems. Treatment consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and use of a heel lift to relieve tension on the calcaneal apophysis. In more severe cases, phycical therapy consisting of modalities to relieve the pain, and stretching exercises may be helpful. In extreme cases, castings have been used.

Non Surgical Treatment

Sever?s disease will go away on its own with rest or after heel bone growth is complete, usually within 2 to 8 weeks after the heel pain or discomfort appears. Sever?s disease is not expected to cause long-term problems, though symptoms may linger for up to several years in severe cases. Certain conservative care measures may be helpful in treating this health problem, including avoiding activities that provoke pain or discomfort, elevating the leg while at rest, performing hamstring and calf muscle stretches two to three times per day, undergoing physical therapy, using cold therapy, using an elastic wrap or compression stocking, Avoiding footwear with heel elevation, toe spring, and toe taper, and instead favoring footwear that?s completely flat and widest at the ends of the toes. More aggressive treatment measures, including over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication (e.g. ibuprofen), steroid injections, and surgery, may be indicated in certain cases. Addressing the footwear component of this health problem is an important part of a well-rounded Sever?s disease treatment plan. Optimal footwear for preventing or treating this problem is flat, wide (widest at the ends of the toes), and flexible in the sole. Open-back footwear (such as certain Crocs models) may be particularly helpful for kids and teens with Sever?s disease.

Recovery

With proper care, your child should feel better within 2 weeks to 2 months. Your child can start playing sports again only when the heel pain is gone. Your doctor will let you know when physical activity is safe.